Embroidery Library
Monogramming with Embroidery

Monogramming with Embroidery

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.


Monograms add a personal and unique look to embroidery projects. They're found on so many things -- shirts, robes, tote bags, pillows, and towels! Embroidery Library has more than 100 alphabets in a wide variety of styles and sizes. In this tutorial we'll show you several ways to use letters, as well as traditional rules for a classic look.
 


Browse through the alphabets at Embroidery Library and select your favorites to get started. The designs used in this tutorial include:
- X4002, Dauphin Alphabet Design Pack
- X13297, Vintage Flower Fade Alphabet Design Pack
- J4732, Monogram Wreath - Lavender
- X9194, Fancy Flourish Alphabet Design Pack
- X4022, Goudy Sans Alphabet Design Pack

Monograms can consist of one, two, three, or more letters. If you're using more than one letter in your project, you can either embroider the letters one at a time, or merge them together in embroidery editing software to make one new design.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
When using two or more letters for the monogram, using paper templates are excellent tool for planning where to stitch.

Print the templates with embroidery software. Cut around the designs and arrange the templates on the fabric and position them where you like.

Mark the center point and axis lines of each template.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Remove the template and load the first letter file.

Move the hoop so the needle is directly over the center point on the fabric and embroider the design.

Then, load the second letter file, move the hoop over the center point, and embroider the design. Repeat this for each letter.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Or, you can use embroidery editing software to merge the letter design together.

This is helpful way to create a file when embroidering a three-letter monogram, or when using letters to write a name or a word.

This tutorial uses Embird Embroidery Software. To make a 3-letter monogram, we placed the letters K, J, and C in a folder on the computer (after downloading the designs).

Then, we opened the letter K.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Next, we opened a second design, the letter C, and merged it on screen with the K.

Then, we repeated the steps to add the J.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Move the designs around until they are positioned where you want them.

You can use the grid on the screen for a guide to get the letters nice and even.

Save the arranged letters as a new design.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Load the design to the machine, and embroider the design.

The exact steps will vary depending on which embroidery software you use.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Here are some other fun examples of using monogramming with embroidery.

This Two Pocket Tote project features a letter from the Vintage Flower Fade Alphabet.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Frame a letter in a wreath with this simple yet elegant Monograms in Wreaths project.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Add a rustic wrap to a jar, vase, bottle, or even a scented candle in a glass votive with this Beautiful Burlap Wrap.

Check out our Monogramming with Embroidery video for step-by-step instructions on how to make the wrap.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
Three letter monograms are traditionally shown in two ways.

When using the letters of the same size, the order is first initial, middle initial, and last.

Free project instructions for monogramming with embroidery.
 When using letters of varying sizes, the order is first initial, last initial, then middle initial.

 
If you are monogramming on a... Place the
monogram....
   
Bath Towel The bottom of the design can be about 4 inches above the hem of an unbanded towel.

The bottom of the design can be about 2 inches above the band on a banded towel.
 
Hand Towel The bottom of the design can be about 2 inches above the hem of an unbanded towel.

The bottom of the design can be about 1.5 inches above the band on a banded towel.
 
Washcloth The bottom of the design can be about 1.5 inches above the hem of an unbanded washcloth.

The bottom of the design can be about 1 inch above the band on a banded washcloth.
 
Bathrobe The top of the design can be 4 to 6 inches down from left shoulder seam.

The center of the monogram can be centered between the outer edge of the lapel and side seam.
 
Shirt cuffs Top center of wrist, 1" up from the outer edge of the cuff.

The monogram should face out (the bottom of the letters pointing toward the outer edge of the cuff).
 
Shirts (golf, polo, pique, sweatshirt, t-shirt) This will vary depending on the size of the shirt. For larger sizes (sizes XXL and higher) position the design so that the top is 7 to 9 inches down from the shoulder seam.

For other shirts (size XL and lower), position the design so that the top of the design is 4 - 6 inches down from the shoulder seam.

For shirts that have a placket, center the design between the placket and the side seam.
 

If you are monogramming for...

A traditional
look is....

   

A married couple that is sharing a last name

A three-letter monogram has the last name initial in the center; the groom's first name initial is on the left, and the bride's is on the right.

It is also acceptable (thought not as common) to have the bride's initial on the left, and the groom's on the right.

   

Someone who has no middle initial

Use a two-letter monogram, where the letters are the same size.

   

Someone who has a last name with an apostrophe (like O'Malley, O'Keefe).

Use the O. (Lisa Marie O'Keefe's monogram is  LOM).
 

   

Someone who has four names, such as Benjamin Timothy Carlson Caraway.
 

A monogram with letters of all the same size looks best: BTCC

You can also stack the letters to make a square:

BT
CC

   

A newly-married couple who are hyphenating both last names to form a new last name. (Douglas Peter Jamieson marries Gail Marie Nelson)

Use a large J and N in the center, smaller D and G on the sides:  DJNG

   

 


Monogramming with Embroidery

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Questions or comments? Let us know! Send an email to us; the address is stitch@emblibrary.com.